Cannabis should be a medicinal ally, but we’ve put it on the wrong side of the drug war

We have a drug problem. Its victims include the very young, cialis sale cialis the very old and everyone in between.

According to The Journal of the American Medical Association, discount cialis cialis sale the number of babies born addicted to opiates has nearly tripled in the last decade. Overdose death rates for the elderly increased twofold from 1999 to 2006. In 2009, drug-induced deaths exceeded deaths from motor vehicle accidents. The culprit: legal prescription painkillers.

In many people, it starts innocently: A fall, an accident or a surgery begets unbearable pain, treated with an opiate painkiller. As useful as these drugs are, they can also be deadly. Their tragedy ripples through a network of family and friends whose lives are also torn apart and forever altered. We can do better.

What if there was a medication that acted on its own endogenous bodily system to relieve pain, as documented in clinical studies, while never resulting in one overdose death? There is. It’s called cannabis.

The real drug problem in this country lies in the war we have waged on this medicinal plant, while ever increasing numbers of young and old suffer and die from legal prescription drugs. It shouldn’t be. It needn’t be. People should have a choice.

We can do better for our families.

Theresa Daniello Auburn Township

 

Handcuffed, alone and forgotten in a windowless, 5×10′ cell without food or water

“I didn’t care if I died – I was completely insane.”

That’s what 23-year-old Daniel Chong told reporters after he was abandoned in his cell for 5 days after a 4/20 Drug Enforcement Agency raid at UC San Diego.1 Handcuffed, viagra generic remedy alone and forgotten in a windowless, buy viagra there 5×10′ room without food or water, (Read More and DO Something about this)

Drugged Driving… Putting Science In Prison

I just completed a 30 day trial of daily dosages of over 1.2g of Cannabis oil a day and I am now convinced that THC metabolites do mitigate the effects of THC. Colorado just started a “Drugged Driving Is Impaired Driving” campaign that is completely propagandist.  To infer that someone had an accident because they have Cannabis in their system does not mean it caused the accident, generic cialis for sale that is absurd to think that way. Look at the science and stop profiling us.

What ever happened to teaching people to take responsibility for themselves? I would never drive if I were impaired, viagra sales no rx but to tell me I am impaired because I am using Cannabis is an insult. Give me a driving test and you will see. I have police follow me everywhere, as I have Cannabis all over my Jeep, and I have not been pulled over for impaired driving. These ads are an insult to us as Cannabis patients.

Pills Pills Pills and More Pills

Pills Pills Pills and More Pills

This campaign may target all drugs, but 90% of this demographic are Cannabis consumers.  I support going after people driving on Ambian and other pharmaceuticals. I have lost a friend in Louisville, Colorado to a woman taking pharmaceuticals who drove over 50′ off the road striking John.  As a patient if I were to see these prejudicial posters in a dispensary, I would share it will all I can, because those that support this campaign have lost my support.  This is only going to hurt us as patients. This is just like RACISM*, the difference being that society calls us DISABLED. Why is our own industry fighting each other with this propaganda.

Where did the money come from to pay for all this advertising?  Wouldn’t it have been better spent telling the truth?

I am very concerned about MMIG, law enforcement and centers that support this. I believe that it is our responsibility as patients to confront this Drugged Driving campaign as it is demeaning to us as disabled people.  This is only furthering Refer Madness.

Beware that City of Indianapolis v. Edmond, 531 U.S. 32 (2000),  is where the Supreme Court of the United States limited the power of law enforcement to conduct suspicionless searches, specifically, using drug-sniffing dogs at roadblocks.

*Hundreds of thousands of us are in prison, have been killed, tortured and abused by law enforcement, and forced to physically build more private prisons.

UPDATE: I am now recording all my driving behavior as a demonstration to the fact that I am not impaired with the elevated doses of Cannabis.

Here is a great book that you may want to read “Science Under Siege: The Politicians’ War on Nature and Truth”  by Todd Wilkinson

Science Under Siege: The Politicians' War on Nature and Truth

 

 

Advocacy Update: Week of 8/15

This last week we met with a wonderful man who is a Veteran of one of our wars at the V.A. in Denver and another man facing prison for growing his own plants to make oil for his cancer.

Bruce is willing to try Cannabis oil and he wants to make sure he is following the law, cialis usa health but because he is from Wy, tadalafil viagra sale the residency requirement in Colorado is a problem.  Bruce was a cartographer for the Air Force and has a sharp mind.

I have been visiting with him, medical his daughter, and his brother, speaking with them about the endocannabinoid system in our bodies and how Cannabis may be able to reduce the size of the tumor in his bladder.  The medical doctors want to surgically remove the tumor, but will not touch it until it is reduced in size.  Most people go for the chemo-therapy or radiation at this point, but Bruce chooses not to take his doctors recommendation.  It has come to Bruce’s attention that Cannabis oil in high concentrations may reduce his tumor without toxic effects.

We also went to Bob Crouse’s hearing in Colorado Springs on Thursday to support his Constitutional Right to use Cannabis oil for his Leukemia.  His trial is now scheduled for December 12th and we are here to support him.  He faces the almost the same thing I went to trial for and he needs our support.

 

See who gets hurt in the War On Cannabis

Marijuana prohibition is harmful Defenders of the War on Marijuana Don’t Have a Clue Who They’re Hurting.

The debate over New York City’s out-of-control marijuana arrest crusade is getting heated, viagra sale ampoule which is exactly what needs to happen. Forced at last to defend this grand travesty before an angry public, tadalafil the mayor’s office is now trying to convince everyone that this epidemic of constitutional violations and racial profiling is somehow good for the community:

The Bloomberg administration says that by arresting more than 350,000 people for having small amounts of marijuana since 2002, the police have helped drive down serious crime — and that the consequences for the people locked up have been minimal.

Nearly 90 percent of those arrested on charges of personal possession of marijuana are black or Latino, although its use by young white people is rampant in affluent quarters of the city.

Faced with criticism from members of the City Council and the State Legislature, aides to Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg have emphasized that few of those arrested on pot charges actually end up with criminal convictions because most cases are dismissed and sealed after one year. In effect, they say, the arrest process itself — which can stretch for 24 hours or more, under squalid conditions in holding pens — is the extent of the punishment. (NYT)

 

It’s amazing enough that any sane person would make light of being thrown in a crowded, disgusting jail in New York City. With the exception of the apparently large number of minor marijuana offenders, I’d really rather not meet most of the people who had to be removed from the streets of NYC on a given day. But that’s just the beginning:

Yet there are other, hidden consequences, say lawyers and advocates who work with those arrested. People regularly lose jobs for missing work as they wait to see a judge or because their employers do not want anyone connected with even minor drug offenses on the payroll, said Marlen Bodden, a staff attorney with the Legal Aid Society.

“They’re clogging the courts and ruining people’s lives, in terms of potential collateral consequences for housing, employment, immigration,” said Steven Banks, the attorney in chief of the Legal Aid Society, which represented 30,000 people in minor marijuana cases last year.

 

It’s incredible that someone would even have to explain how getting arrested for drugs actually does really, really suck. Obvious truths such as these are routinely and nonchalantly obscured by drug war defenders any time an issue like this comes into focus, and it’s easy to lose sight of how genuinely and uniquely ridiculous each and every such statement truly is. Getting arrested for marijuana isn’t a big deal? Seriously?

Apologists for mass marijuana arrests will compare the whole process to giving out parking tickets right up until the point when we propose legislation to actually treat marijuana that way, at which point they will predictably go ballistic. The same idiots who claim that we need tough penalties to “send the right message to our young people,” will turn around in an instant and announce in the newspaper that the punishment for marijuana is just a slap on the wrist. That’s how desperate, dishonest, and confused the proponents of marijuana prohibition have become, and it’s a step forward for reform any time we can force them to open their mouths.